Sunday, April 26, 2015

@christoperj:

Ahh, springtime in Texas. . .

Saturday, April 25, 2015

@christoperj:

Back from executing a HIPAA Assessment in Tampa -- returning to regularly scheduled programming, already in progress. . .

Friday, April 10, 2015

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Apparently @Verizon Can Record Telemarketing Calls, But Also Has An Official Policy to Disconnect the Call If I Ask to Do The Same. . . (Who Knew?)

Just got a call from a Verizon telemarketer @ 516-570-9227 looking to sell me something. They first say they are recording the call for "quality purposes". Very standard stuff.

But when I ask to do the same on my end -- the sales agent then tried to end the call stating "It's "Verizon's policy to immediately disconnect the call" and proceeded to thank me for my time.

(Um What?)

I asked her to confirm -- She did.

I asked her if she saw the irony in that Verizon is recording the call to hold me to a sale, but refusing to allow me to record the call to hold them to their sales pitch -- She repeated the "Verizon's policy to immediately disconnect. . ." line after a few seconds pause.

I giggled, thanked her, and explained that I understood that, but asked again from "one person to another" if she saw the irony of what she was saying -- She repeated the "Verizon's policy to immediately disconnect. . ." line after a few more seconds pause.

I thanked her again, and asked to speak to a supervisor -- She (after a few more seconds pause) said that a supervisor would tell me the same think that it was "Verizon's policy to immediately disconnect. . ."

I explained that I understood that, but I also recognized that there was probably somebody listening given the pauses and that I would still like to speak to a supervisor -- She said (after another pause) that there was no supervisor available and that it was "Verizon's policy to immediately disconnect. . ."

I then gave up, and she proceeded to try to "thank [me] for my time" again.

At least this is the best I remember since they refused to allow me to record the call.

Whatever the case, I'm deeply amused by the irony that Verizon's official corporate policy is apparently that they can record the call to hold me to a sale, but if I ask to record the call to hold them to what they are claiming on the call -- it's immediately game over.

None of this really matters legally since both Texas (where I'm at) and New York (where this telemarketer's phone number claims she was) are both one-party consent states. And I had permission from myself to record, so all good there. Didn't, but could have.

So my best guess is that they don't want to be held accountable for what their telemarketers are saying. And probably don't want to risk some of the PR situations that have burned Comcast and Time Warner.

But since this one Verizon representative refused to say anything beyond the official policy and refused to allow me to talk to a supervisor (which itself seems like a TCPA violation) -- guess I'll never really know for sure.

Made me laugh, though.

Good Times

Monday, March 30, 2015

@christoperj:

A customer is a customer is a customer. . .